Gerhard Fasol: Entropy, information and Ludwig Boltzmann

Entropy, information and Ludwig Boltzmann, 10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 20 February 2018

Gerhard Fasol CEO, Eurotechnology Japan KK, Board Director, GMO Cloud KK. former faculty Cambridge University and past Fellow, Trinity College Cambridge

Ludwig Boltzmann 20 February 1844 – 5 September 1906

Ludwig Boltzmann 20 February 1844 - 5 September 1906
Ludwig Boltzmann 20 February 1844 – 5 September 1906

We use Ludwig Boltzmann’s results every day. Here are some examples:

  • The definition of the units of temperature, Kelvin, Celsius, are directly linked to Boltzmann’s constant
  • The Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law tells us that the total energy emitted by a black body per unit surface area is proportional to the 4th power of the temperature, and allows us to measure temperatures at a distance. For example, the temperature of the surface of the sun can be measured using the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law
  • Boltzmann’s formula S = k log W links the macroscopic Entropy with the probability (W = Wahrscheinlichkeit) of a macrostate
  • Boltzmann’s transport equations are used for many purposes, to simulate carrier transport in semiconductor devices, and to design airplanes, turbine blades and cars
  • Ludwig Boltzmann’s philosophy of nature contributes to our understanding of nature and our world

Ludwig Boltzmann was proposed several times for the Nobel Prize: 1903, 1905 and three times in 1906, the year he took his life in Duino, Italy.

Ludwig Boltzmann achieved his Matura, Austria’s high-school examination required to enter University education at the age of 19 in 1863.

In 1865, at the age of 21, he published his first research paper entitled “Über die Bewegung der Elektrizität in krummen Flächen” (electricity in curved surfaces). It was the dawn of our electrical age, Maxwell created his Maxwell’s equations in 1861-1862, and on 15 February 1883, 20 years later, Tokyo Dentsu KK received the license to start its electricity business in Tokyo.

Among Ludwig Boltzmann’s teachers were Josef Loschmidt and Jozef Stefan.

Josef Loschmidt proposed structures for 300 chemical compounds including benzene, he determined the number of gas molecules in a given volume and the Loschmidt constant is named after him.

Jozef Stefan created the Stefan-Boltzmann Law with Ludwig Boltzmann, and used it to determine the temperature of the surface of the sun.

Ludwig Boltzmann traveled extensively, was in correspondence and discussions and scientific exchange with most major scientists of the time. He also moved professionally:

  • University of Vienna
  • 1867-1869 Privat-Dozent
  • 1869-1873 Full Professor of Mathematical Physics in Graz
  • 1873-1876 Full Professor of Mathematics in Vienna
  • 1876-1890 Full Professor at University of Graz, Head of the Institute of Physics
  • 1887-1888 Rektor (President) of the University of Graz
  • 1890-1894 Professor University of München
  • 1894-1900 Professor University of Vienna
  • 1900-1902 Professor of Theoretical Physics University of Leipzig
  • 1902- Professor University of Vienna

Ludwig Boltzmann supported and worked with women:

One of Ludwig Boltzmann’s students was Lise Meitner (November 1878 – 27 October 1968). Lise Meitner was part of Otto Han’s team that discovered nuclear fission, Otto Hahn was awarded the Nobel Prize. Lise Meitner was the second woman to earn a PhD degree in Physics at the University of Vienna. The Element 109, Meitnerium is named about Lise Meitner.

The first President of Osaka University (1931-1934), Nagaoka Kantaro (1865 – 1950) was Ludwig Boltzmann’s student in München around 1892-1893.

The unit of temperature, Celsius or Kelvin, is directly linked to Boltzmann’s constant k

Currently the unit of Temperature Kelvin is defined as follows:

One Kelvin is defined such that the temperature of the triple point of water is exactly 273.16 Kelvin.
For this definition to be reproducible, the water needs to be defined: its defined as VSNOW = Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water.
While this definition may have been best at the time it was set, clearly its not sufficient for today.

When the SI system of physical units will be redefined next year, the definition of the unit of temperature, Kelvin will be:

Kelvin is defined such, that the numerical value of the Boltzmann constant k is equal to exactly 1.380650 x 10^-23 JK^-1.

Thus the unit of temperature Kelvin is directly linked to Boltzmann’s constant.

For more details, see: Boltzmann constant and the new SI system of units

What is Entropy?

Entropy measures information, entropy is the measure of information.

Macro-states, determined for example by the macroscopic quantities pressure (p), Volume (V), or Temperature (T), or number of particles (N), contain a very large number of micro-states.

Boltzmann’s Entropy S = k logarithm of the phase volume(= the probability) of a macro-state in terms of the possible micro-states.

Different faces of Entropy

Entropy has many faces

  • thermodynamic entropy, is a macroscopic state parameter of a system in equilibrium, like temperature, pressure, volume. However, can we measure entropy directly?
  • microscopic, statistical entropy
    • Boltzmann Entropy: S = k log W
    • Gibbs entropy
  • information theory
    • Shannon’s entropy

Shannon’s entropy

Shannon: “I thought of calling it “information”. But the word was overly used, so I decided to call it “uncertainty”. When I discussed it with John von Neumann, he had a better idea:

  1. in the first place your uncertainty has been used in statistical mechanics (ie by Boltzmann) under that name, so it already has a name
  2. in the second place, and more importantly, no one knows what entropy really is, so in a debate you will always have the advantage

What can we learn from Ludwig Boltzmann?

  • Empower young people, recognize and support talent early
    • LB published first scientific work at age 21
    • Full Professor at 25
    • Head of Department at 32
    • President of University at 43
  • Talent is not linear – talent is exponential
  • Move around the world. Connect. Interact.
  • Empower women (LB promoted many women)
  • Don’t accept authority for authority’s sake
  • Science/physics issues need to be treated with the methods of physics/science
  • No dogmas
  • Support entrepreneurs (LB supported airplane developers before airplanes existed)
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo

Copyright (c) 2018 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

Tomoko Nakanishi: What is revealed by radiation in living plants

What is revealed by radiation in living plants, 10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 20 February 2018

Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor

Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor

Copyright (c) 2018 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

Hiroyuki Sasaki: Strategy and Serendipity in Science

Strategy and Serendipity in Science, 10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 20 February 2018

Hiroyuki Sasaki, Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation

Hiroyuki Sasaki, Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
Hiroyuki Sasaki, Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
Hiroyuki Sasaki, Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
Hiroyuki Sasaki, Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
Hiroyuki Sasaki, Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
Hiroyuki Sasaki, Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
Hiroyuki Sasaki Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
Hiroyuki Sasaki Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo

Copyright (c) 2018 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

Wolfgang Kautek: Nanotechnology and critical raw materials

Nanotechnology and critical raw materials, 10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 20 February 2018

Wolfgang Kautek, Professor for Physical Chemistry at University of Vienna, Member of Scientific Board of Austrian Research Associations, President of the Erwin Schrödinger Society for Nanosciences (ESG), Chairman of the Research Group “Physical Chemistry” of the Austrian Chemical Society (GÖCh)

Wolfgang Kautek, Professor for Physical Chemistry at University of Vienna, Member of Scientific Board of Austrian Research Associations, President of the Erwin Schrödinger Society for Nanosciences (ESG), Chairman of the Research Group "Physical Chemistry" of the Austrian Chemical Society (GÖCh)
Wolfgang Kautek, Professor for Physical Chemistry at University of Vienna, Member of Scientific Board of Austrian Research Associations, President of the Erwin Schrödinger Society for Nanosciences (ESG), Chairman of the Research Group “Physical Chemistry” of the Austrian Chemical Society (GÖCh)

Modern nanotechnology is rapidly advancing in areas such as digital technologies (e.g. flat panel displays), lighting technologies (e.g. White LED’s), electric mobility (high performance permanent magnets for electrical motors), catalysts (e.g. for car exhaust treatment), and medical diagnostics and therapy. These technologies cause an exponential increase of the demand of Critical Raw Materials (“CRMs”, Fig. 1, Table 1).

Fig. 1: Elements widely used before and after the industrial revolution until present time (© Zepf V., Reller A., Rennie C., Ashfield M. Simmons J., “Materials critical to the energy industry. An introduction”, BP (2014), 2nd edition, ISBN 978-0-9928387-0-6)
Fig. 1: Elements widely used before and after the industrial revolution until present time
(© Zepf V., Reller A., Rennie C., Ashfield M. Simmons J., “Materials critical to the energy industry. An introduction”, BP (2014), 2nd edition, ISBN 978-0-9928387-0-6)
Table 1: Critical Raw Materials  (Examples from European Union 2014, “Report of the Ad hoc Working Group on defining critical raw materials”)
Table 1: Critical Raw Materials
(Examples from European Union 2014, “Report of the Ad hoc Working Group on defining critical raw materials”)

This is in contrast to a world-wide extremely diverse production concentration and mining activities (Fig. 2) leading to supply risks which are influenced by market concentrations, producer governance indicators, substitutability, and recycling rates.

Fig. 2: Countries accounting for largest share of global supply of Critical Raw Materials  (© European Union, 2017: „Study on the review of the list of Critical Raw Materials - Final Report”, doi:10.2873/876644)
Fig. 2: Countries accounting for largest share of global supply of Critical Raw Materials
(© European Union, 2017: „Study on the review of the list of Critical Raw Materials – Final Report”, doi:10.2873/876644)

Therefore, concepts of recourse decoupling, between economic activity and resource use, have to be targeted. Examples of the author’s current research in graphene nanosheets as transparent conductors (Fig. 3) and the laser generation of colloidal nanoparticles for tumor diagnostics (Fig. 4) are discussed in awareness of critical raw material and conflict resources.

Fig. 3: Graphene Electrochemistry (© M. Pfaffeneder-Kmen, F. Bausch, G. Trettenhahn, W. Kautek, J. Phys. Chem. C 120 (2015) 15563–15568; M. Pfaffeneder-Kmen, I. Falcon Casas, A. Naghilou, G. Trettenhahn, W. Kautek, Electrochim. Acta 255 (2017) 160-167)
Fig. 3: Graphene Electrochemistry
(© M. Pfaffeneder-Kmen, F. Bausch, G. Trettenhahn, W. Kautek, J. Phys. Chem. C 120 (2015) 15563–15568; M. Pfaffeneder-Kmen, I. Falcon Casas, A. Naghilou, G. Trettenhahn, W. Kautek, Electrochim. Acta 255 (2017) 160-167)
Fig. 4: Laser ablation synthesis in solutions (LASiS) of dual mode contrast agents for tumor diagnostics (© N. Lasemi, U. Pacher, C. Rentenberger, O. Bomati Miguel, W. Kautek, ChemPhysChem 18 (2017) 1118–1124; N. Lasemi, U. Pacher, L.V. Zhigilei, O. Bomati-Miguel, R. Lahoz, W. Kautek, Applied Surface Science 433 (2018) 772–779)
Fig. 4: Laser ablation synthesis in solutions (LASiS) of dual mode contrast agents for tumor diagnostics
(© N. Lasemi, U. Pacher, C. Rentenberger, O. Bomati Miguel, W. Kautek, ChemPhysChem 18 (2017) 1118–1124; N. Lasemi, U. Pacher, L.V. Zhigilei, O. Bomati-Miguel, R. Lahoz, W. Kautek, Applied Surface Science 433 (2018) 772–779)
Wolfgang Kautek, Professor for Physical Chemistry at University of Vienna, Member of Scientific Board of Austrian Research Associations, President of the Erwin Schrödinger Society for Nanosciences (ESG), Chairman of the Research Group "Physical Chemistry" of the Austrian Chemical Society (GÖCh)
Wolfgang Kautek, Professor for Physical Chemistry at University of Vienna, Member of Scientific Board of Austrian Research Associations, President of the Erwin Schrödinger Society for Nanosciences (ESG), Chairman of the Research Group “Physical Chemistry” of the Austrian Chemical Society (GÖCh)
Konstantin Saupe, Wolfgang Kautek, Gerhard Fasol (left to right)
Konstantin Saupe, Wolfgang Kautek, Gerhard Fasol (left to right)
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo

Copyright (c) 2018 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018

Energy. Entropy. Leadership.

Gerhard Fasol

10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo

10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum Tokyo

Program

  • Welcome by the Ambassador of Austria, represented by Magister Konstantin Saupe (Embassy of Austria)
  • Gerhard Fasol CEO Eurotechnology Japan KK, Board Director GMO Cloud KK, Guest-Professor Kyushu University, former faculty Cambridge University and Tokyo University, past Fellow, Trinity College Cambridge “Entropy, Information and Ludwig Boltzmann
  • Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission, President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor “What is revealed by radiation in living plants
  • Hiroyuki Sasaki Vice-President Kyushu University, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation “Strategy and Serendipity in Science
  • Wolfgang Kautek Professor for Physical Chemistry at University of Vienna, Member of Scientific Board of Austrian Research Associations, President of the Erwin Schrödinger Society for Nanosciences (ESG), Chairman of the Research Group “Physical Chemistry” of the Austrian Chemical Society (GÖCh) “Nanotechnology and Critical Raw Materials
Gerhard Fasol CEO, Eurotechnology Japan KK, Board Director, GMO Cloud KK. former faculty Cambridge University and past Fellow, Trinity College Cambridge
Gerhard Fasol CEO, Eurotechnology Japan KK, Board Director, GMO Cloud KK. former faculty Cambridge University and past Fellow, Trinity College Cambridge
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Tomoko Nakanishi Commissioner, Japan Atomic Energy Commission President, Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences, Tokyo University Professor
Hiroyuki Sasaki Kyushu University Vice-President, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
Hiroyuki Sasaki Kyushu University Vice-President, Director of the Epigenome Network Research Center, Professor, Medical Institute of Bioregulation
Wolfgang Kautek Professor for Physical Chemistry at University of Vienna, Member of Scientific Board of Austrian Research Associations, President of the Erwin Schrödinger Society for Nanosciences (ESG), Chairman of the Research Group "Physical Chemistry" of the Austrian Chemical Society (GÖCh)
Wolfgang Kautek Professor for Physical Chemistry at University of Vienna, Member of Scientific Board of Austrian Research Associations, President of the Erwin Schrödinger Society for Nanosciences (ESG), Chairman of the Research Group “Physical Chemistry” of the Austrian Chemical Society (GÖCh)
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo
10th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2018, Tuesday 20 February 2018 at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo

Copyright (c) 2018 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2017

Energy. Entropy. Leadership.

Creator and curator: Gerhard Fasol

9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2017, Thursday 16 February 2017, at the Embassy of Austria in Tokyo

9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2017

Program

9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017 speakers (left to right): Masato Wakayama, Chuck Casto, Gerhard Fasol, Her Imperial Highness Princess Takamado, Yayoi Kamimura, Minoru Koshibe, Konstantin Saupe (Embassy of Austria)
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017 speakers (left to right): Masato Wakayama, Chuck Casto, Gerhard Fasol, Her Imperial Highness Princess Takamado, Yayoi Kamimura, Minoru Koshibe, Konstantin Saupe (Embassy of Austria)
Gerhard Fasol, CEO, Eurotechnology Japan KK, Board Director, GMO Cloud KK. former faculty Cambridge University and past Fellow, Trinity College Cambridge: Entropy, information and Ludwig Boltzmann
Gerhard Fasol, CEO, Eurotechnology Japan KK, Board Director, GMO Cloud KK. former faculty Cambridge University and past Fellow, Trinity College Cambridge: Entropy, information and Ludwig Boltzmann
Masato Wakayama, Executive Vice-President & Trustee, Kyushu University, Distinguished Professor of Mathematics
Masato Wakayama, Executive Vice-President & Trustee, Kyushu University, Distinguished Professor of Mathematics
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
Chuck Casto, Licensed Nuclear Power Station Operator. Was NRC regulator responsible for 23 nuclear power stations. Leader of the US Integrated Government and NRC efforts in Japan during the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011.
Chuck Casto, Licensed Nuclear Power Station Operator. Was NRC regulator responsible for 23 nuclear power stations. Leader of the US Integrated Government and NRC efforts in Japan during the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011.
Yayoi Kamimura, INTEL, Global Account Executive, previously: NTT Docomo, Director and Head of Business Development & Investment
Yayoi Kamimura, INTEL, Global Account Executive, previously: NTT Docomo, Director and Head of Business Development & Investment
Minoru Koshibe, Mitsui Chemicals, Executive Vice-President, health care business sector and other business sectors
Minoru Koshibe, Mitsui Chemicals, Executive Vice-President, health care business sector and other business sectors
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
Makoto Suematsu, President, Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development
Makoto Suematsu, President, Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017
9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017

The Ludwig Boltzmann Forum is invitation only. Contact us here if you are interested to discuss current or future events and cooperations:

Copyright (c) 2017 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing

AMED challenges for global data sharing

Makoto Suematsu

keynote talk given at 9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017

by Makoto Suematsu, President, Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED)

Summary written by Gerhard Fasol

We share data in space science, why don’t we share data and expensive equipment in medicine?

AMED. Our Vision: to fast-track medical R&D. Create catalytic systems to fast-track medical R&D for human’s quality of life (QOL)

AMED is financed by three Japanese Government Ministries with a total budget of US$ 1.4 billion in FY2015.

  • METI
  • MEXT
  • MHLW

AMED not only offers budgets, but also officers and scientists with new mindsets.

In a way AMED corresponds to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle:

Amino acids / glucose / lipids correspond to the METI / MEXT / MHLW Ministries.

AMED catalyzes these 3 different substrates to galvanize medical R&D processes.

Brain/MINDS (Brain Mapping by Integrated Neurotechnologies for Disease Studies) project

Purpose of the Brain Mapping by Integrated Neurotechnologies for Disease Studies (Brain/MINDS) project is to map a primate brain to help understand brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. For an overview see:

Overcoming balkanization: patients’ needs vs physicians’s desire (e.g. to publish papers)

We need to overcome balkanization, and share ideas and data, e.g. we need to overcome the conflicts of interests between patients’ needs and the desire of physicians for example to publish scientific papers. We need to overcome balkanization of sequencers vs physicians, scientists vs bureaucrats, universities vs industry, and especially bureaucrats vs. bureaucrats (e.g. from a different Ministry) etc.

AMED: How to reform medical R&D systems?

  • make “inflexible and balkanized funding” flexible and unified
  • promote global alliances to facilitate data sharing
  • support ARO network in University Hospitals for activating clinical research
  • optimize peer-review in pilot projects: online in English (partly from FY2016), 5 all-English programs, database of all accepted proposals
  • overcome “ECG budgets” and promote PPP
  • social implementation of genomic medicine

Initiative on Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases (IRUD)

Homepage of AMED’s Initiative on Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases (IRUD):

see also:

Our aim is to overcome the “N-of-1 problem” by data sharing, i.e. we work to find patients with similar rare and undiagnosed diseases.

Why did we start from IRUD?

We want to improve 3 different types of life: life science, diary life and quality of life of patients and family.

We want to stop “research for budgets”, and empower “budgets for research”.

We want to encourage global data sharing, and overcome researcher’s inner biological behavior.

We want to overcome fragmentization of budgets and of expensive machines.

We want to overcome the phenomenon of “Darth Vader-type Professors”.

Data sharing not only for diagnosis, but also for drug discovery.

We respect front-line physicians who help patents who suffer from “diagnostic odyssey”, who are sent from test to test without hearing a valid diagnosis or treatment.

Our IRUD Regional Alliance includes 200 hospitals in Japan. We have more than 2000 registered families, and our program is showing first results with case matches of patients with similar rare diseases with foreign countries.

Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMO)

Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMO) at Tohoku University provides high quality genome variant data as an open resource: http://www.megabank.tohoku.ac.jp/

On 11 January 2016 we concluded a Memorandum of Cooperation between NIH and AMED.

SCRUM-Japan

SCRUM-Japan is a nation-wide, multi-centric cancer genome screening program with headquarters at the National Cancer Center in Kashiwa: http://epoc.ncc.go.jp/scrum/.
SCRUM-Japan is a successful academia-industry cooperation program encouraging data sharing among pharmaceutical sectors. Many major pharmaceutical companies cooperate.

National Clinical Database

The National Clinical Database includes more than 95% of operation data of general surgery in Japan: http://www.ncd.or.jp/

AMED supports the application of the National Clinical Database (NCD) to post-market surveillance of medical devices.

Real World Data (SSMIX 1+2) – Science Information NETwork 5 (SINET5)

TOP

AMED will start investments from April FY2017

Data sharing in AMED: no trust – no sharing: no man is an island.

  • IRUD & SCRUM-J, using ToMMo with more than 4000 Japanese variants
  • NCD extension to clinical research
  • Clinical genomics data base (from FY2016): rare diseases, cancer, infectious diseases, dementia
  • Central IRB projects
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing

Copyright (c) 2017 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals

Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals

Minoru Koshibe

keynote talk given at 9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017

Minoru Koshibe, Mitsui Chemicals, Executive Vice-President, health care business sector and other business sectors

Summary written by Gerhard Fasol

Minoru Koshibe – Profile

Minoru Koshibe majored in protein crystallography with a Master’s Degree. He started work at a predecessor company in 1978, worked in processor engineering, and later in head quarters in corporate planning.
Mitsui Chemicals was established by merger in 1997. Minoru Koshibe in 2003 joined the fine chemicals division, was involved in the Sankyo Agro acquisition, in the establishment of subsidiaries/affiliates (JPS, HMCI, OPC, YK, JC and others), and in M&A (Acumen, KOC, Hereaus Kulzer)
Minoru Koshibe worked 17 years in manufacturing, basic chemicals, R&D, construction and production,
9 years in the function chemicals business sector, and
12 years in corporate planning, and business planning.

About the Mitsui Chemicals Group

Our corporate mission is:

Contribute broadly to society by providing high-quality products and services to customers through innovation and the creation of materials, while keeping in harmony with the global environment

And our corporate target is:

Constantly pursuing innovation and growth to become a chemical group with an undisputed global presence

  • Founded: 01 October 1997 by merger, however Omuta Works started operation in 1912, so including predecessor companies Mitsui Chemicals has over 100 years history
  • Paid in capital: YEN 125 billion
  • Subsidiaries and affiliates: 133 (55 in Japan, 17 in the Americas, 20 in Europe, 16 in China, 7 in Singapore, and 18 elsewhere
  • Employees: 13,600 (9,300 in Japan, 1,350 in the Americas, 1,100 in Europe, 800 in China, and 1,050 elsewhere

Business Segments

  • Mobility (26%): PP compounds, elastomers, performance polymers, electrolytes
  • Healthcare (13%): vision care, nonwovens, dental, amino acids
  • Food and Packaging (16%): packaging films, protection films, agrochemicals, hybrid rice
  • Basic materials (45%): gas pipes, bi-phenol, methyl methacrylate, PET resins, polyurethane

Origins and history of the Mitsui Chemicals Group:

  • 1912. Contribute to solving food shortages caused by rapid population growth: manufacture raw materials for fertilizers from exhaust gas, a byproduct of coal business
  • 1932. Contribute to preserve our indigo culture: achieve Japan’s first successful production of indigo dye by using chemical technology
  • 1958. Contribute to industrial modernization. Construct Japan’s first petrochemical complex.

MCI 2025 Basic Strategies

  • Pursue innovation
  • Accelerate global expansion
  • Strengthen competitiveness of existing businesses

Strategy for our Healthcare Domain

FY2016: Operating income = YEN 15 billion
FY2025: Operating income = YEN 45 billion + new business

Creation of new products

  • vision: functional ophthalmic lens line-up
  • hygiene: new functional nonwovens
  • personal: new products for detergent and cosmetics
  • oral: 3D printers and laser milling machines

Strengthen existing businesses

  • vision: sales activities in North America, China and India
  • hygiene: high functional nonwovens
  • personal: licensing business
  • oral: periodontal disease treatment drugs, IoT and network solution business, denture and OSA mouthpiece business in North America

New business

  • vision: electronic glasses (see in the photographs below: Mr Minoru Koshibe was wearing prototype electronic glasses during the keynote lecture)
  • personal: surgical materials, physical mobility
  • oral: new domains of dental materials

Globalization

  • hygiene: specialized products
  • oral: dental business in India, ASEAN, Middle East and Eastern-Europe, dentures and OSA mouthpieces in Europe and Asia

Strategy for our healthcare domain: fusion of materials and IT, realization of personalized healthcare, open innovation

Super Aging Society is coming soon

As regenerative medicine technology advances, life expectancy might increase to 100 years age by the year 2050

Japan’s population has peaked around 125 million around 2010, and may decrease to around 50 million by 2100

When asked for their biggest regret in life, 70% of old people answer: Not to have taken on challenges:
Lets live to accomplish your purpose!
Lets make a meaningful life!

Lets change our thinking about aging: instead of seeing old age as a decrease in value, lets see old age as seniority, as increasing value through knowledge, challenges and experience!

Concern about Japanese Conglomerates

Over the last 20 years the “earning power” of Japanese companies decreased compared with other major countries.

Market capitalization (corporate value) of Japanese corporations is falling behind compared to both Western countries and emerging countries:

The stock index FY2016 / FY1990:

  • Japan = 0.7
  • USA = 7
  • Germany = 7
  • India = 24
  • China = 24
  • Indonesia = 12

thus while the stock index has grown 7 times both in Germany and USA, and grown 24 times in India and China, it has actually fallen by 30% in Japan.

Market capitalization FY2015 / FY1990:

  • Japan = 1.7
  • USA = 8.1
  • Germany = 4.8
  • India = 5.4
  • China = 16
  • Indonesia = 5.3

while the market capitalization has grown 8.1 times in USA, 4.8 times in Germany, and grown 5.4 times in India and 16 times in China, it has only grown 1.7 times in Japan.

Capital markets are actually highly complex systems including the markets (stock exchanges) investors, intermediaries, are influenced by disclosures and governance rules. We need to improve the system as a whole, as well as its parts, to improve the performance of Japanese corporations.

Epilogue

In the past technology was made for people, e.g. airplanes and jets. In future more and more products will be made for robots, drones and other machines. Where is the place for people in such a world?

Lets build a society where technology (robots) and people can coexist!

Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals (Mr Minoru Kishibe is wearing and demonstrating prototype electronic glasses)
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals (Mr Minoru Kishibe is wearing and demonstrating prototype electronic glasses)
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals (Mr Minoru Kishibe is wearing and demonstrating prototype electronic glasses)
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals (Mr Minoru Kishibe is wearing and demonstrating prototype electronic glasses)
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals (Mr Minoru Kishibe is wearing and demonstrating prototype electronic glasses)
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals (Mr Minoru Kishibe is wearing and demonstrating prototype electronic glasses)
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Minoru Koshibe: Growth and innovation at Mitsui Chemicals
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing
Makoto Suematsu: AMED challenges for global data sharing

Copyright (c) 2017 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan

Innovation – A style in Japan

Yayoi Kamimura

keynote talk given at 9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017

by Yayoi Kamimura INTEL, Global Account Executive, previously: NTT Docomo, Director and Head of Business Development & Investment

Summary written by Gerhard Fasol

Yayoi Kamimura – self introduction

  • 20 years experience in open innovation, services alliance and JV with foreign companies
  • originally investment banker
  • promote innovation to customers with cutting edge Silicon Valley technology
  • Joint ventures and investments: PLDT, Sri Lanka Telecom, StarHub, Codelco, TT&T
  • Service alliances and collaborations: runtastic for docomo, Toyota, M-TV, SEGA
  • Anti-Fraud App: “hi its me” fraud crime exceeds US$ 400 million/year in Japan. Recently launched anti-mobile fraud app to protect the elderly population from these types of crime. The system monitors suspicious in-coming calls to the elderly, then sends alerts to their family

Snap shots: Macro view on Japan’s innovation landscape

R&D and patent applications

2016 R&D expenditure vs GDP

  1. USA: GDP (PPP) = US$ 18,559 Bill, R&D 2.77% of GDP
  2. China: GDP (PPP) = US$ 20,015 Bill, R&D 1.98% of GDP
  3. Japan: GDP (PPP) = US$ 4,913 Bill, R&D 3.39% of GDP
  4. Germany: GDP (PPP) = US$ 3,741 Bill, R&D 2.92% of GDP

Patent applications by Chinese companies have been sky-rocketing since 2000, while patent applications by US, Korean and European companies are steadily increasing, patent applications by Japanese corporations have peaked around 2000, and have been decreasing ever since 2000.

Japan is trailing in R&D efficiency, defined as total value add in the last 4 years / total $ spent for R&D between 8-6 years ago:

While R&D efficiency in USA and Germany is similar between 80-90 times during the last 10 years, R&D efficiency in Japan has dropped from 80 times in the 1990s to near 60 times currently.

Venture Capital and start-ups

With only 3.7% of the population, Japan has one of the lowest ratios of entrepreneurs in the world.

In countries like Zambia, Nigeria or Ethiopia the entrepreneur population is on the order of 40% of the population.

In China, USA, Canada, the entrepreneur population is on the order of 12-14%.

In Japan the entrepreneur population is only 3.7% – similar to France, Belgium, Germany.

Venture Capital Funding is shockingly low in Japan

VC Funding 2016:

  • USA: VC Funding US$ 60 billion
  • China: VC Funding US$ 20 billion
  • Japan: VC Funding US$ 2 billion

Start-up ecosystem

Japan does not appear in rankings of the “hottest start-up ecosystems” (source: Spark Labs Global Venture):

  1. Silicon Valley
  2. Stockholm
  3. Tel Aviv
  4. New York
  5. Seoul
  6. Boston
  7. Los Angeles
  8. Beijing
  9. London
  10. Berlin

Start-up ecosystems require:

  1. startup culture
  2. engineering talent
  3. technology infrastructure
  4. economic foundation
  5. funding and exits
  6. active monitoring
  7. legal and policy infrastructure
  8. government policy and programs

As a result of “Digital-Capital” mobile internet unicorns in Q1 2015, which include Facebook at the top, only three Japanese “unicorns” appear in the ranking: DeNA, GREE, and Cookpad.

USA has a large number of young companies, established since the 1970s with high market caps, e.g. Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon etc.

Japan has only one single such company: SoftBank.

What can we change today?

In the public domain we need changes:

  • Education system, STEM: coding population, diversity, gender gap bridges
  • Public sector R&D: DARPA like organization, TAX breaks
  • Policy change: deregulation, promotion or open innovation, funds flow, capital markets
  • Universities and research agencies: more funds, clear goal set and PDCA

In the private domain we need changes:

  • Organization: double decker structure, CVC
  • Management: vision and target setting, acquisition & development rather than R&D / not NIH, start-up inclusion
  • Process: PDCA, SPEED, ROI monitoring
  • People: talent, skilled labor, IP and Legal, Standardization
  • Funds

We need entrepreneurs, especially those who can compete globally

We need many more coding population in face of the software defined economy, we need to rewrite our DNA

We need to expand the funds flow to startups, from public sector and from private capital markets

Conclusions

  1. Japan is now facing big challenges and global competition to even keep the status quo in innovation
  2. Both public and private level, we should rewrite our DNA and accelerate the rejuvenation our economy
  3. Innovation happens where money is. We should be ready to invest in more riskier assets of start-ups, both on private and public level. And the money does flow where returns are sound
  4. Build our ecosystems and gain the momentum to maximize innovation, producing next generations of Sony, Honda, Toyota… they were all ventures at their start
  5. Large enterprises transform themselves and/or we welcome the rise of new generation entrepreneur players
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan
Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2017
Ludwig Boltzmann Forum 2017
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan
Yayoi Kamimura: Innovation – A style in Japan

Copyright (c) 2017 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan

Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan

Chuck Casto

keynote talk given at 9th Ludwig Boltzmann Forum, Embassy of Austria in Tokyo, 16 March 2017

by Chuck Casto Licensed Nuclear Power Station Operator. Was NRC regulator responsible for 23 nuclear power stations. Leader of the US Integrated Government and NRC efforts in Japan during the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011

Summary written by Gerhard Fasol

Five crisis – all five crisis must be solved

The Fukushima nuclear disaster is not a triple crisis, as sometimes stated, but five crisis:

  • earthquake
  • Tsunami
  • nuclear plants, including clean-up
  • social impacts
  • policy

All five crisis must be addressed, and a system solution must be found and implemented.

The Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear disaster was caused by a system failure both of the Government and the Utility (Tokyo Electric Power, TEPCO)

The nuclear disaster was caused by a long list of failures and mistakes, not by one single factor:

  • the plant was constructed at the wrong place
  • the well known Tsunami history was ignored, land was lowered to near sea level to save money for pumping water, exposing the nuclear plant to Tsunamis
  • Lessons from Chernobyl were not learnt, incorrect venting procedures were used
  • Mistakes in emergency planning and crisis leadership: there was not enough planning for the case of accidents
  • Lessons from the US 9/11 terror attack were ignored, and US advice was rejected: no backup electricity was provided
  • A misalignment of values
  • Policy imbalance between power and responsibility

Instead of the prevalent “safety myth”, we must start from the position that accidents can happen.

The balance of power and responsibility

Which group has the legal power and who has the legal responsibility?

Misalignment of values held by (1) nuclear utilities, (2) the public and (3) the Government leads to distrust, and as a result doubt, uncertainty, fear, anxiety, insults, anger, and loss of trust in the system.

The values need to be realigned to create a system to protect public health and the environment.

We must have a clear legal basis for roles and responsibilities.
The utilities (electric power companies) need to be ultimately responsibly.
There is a public and government reluctance to give the utilities clear and sole responsibility.

Lessons from the Three Mile Island Accident

Before the Three Mile Island Accident we had an imbalance between:

  • the power of the utility (the nuclear plant operator)
  • the responsibility of state and federal authorities
  • the public

This imbalance was corrected and rebalanced after the Three Mile Island accident:

  • the law was changed regarding risk: the law demands now a “reasonable assurance”
  • the regulator was strengthened
  • an industry excellence organization was formed

Similarly in Japan we need to rebalance the system of power, responsibility and accountability of all players:

The pyramid of power needs to be with the Government and the Diet on top:

  • Government and the Diet
  • Government agencies and ministries
  • Extra-government organizations
  • Prefectures and Local governments
  • Nuclear utilities, nuclear plant operators
  • Public and non-governmental organizations

This power pyramid needs to be balanced with responsibility and accountability of:

  • Nuclear utilities, nuclear plant operators
  • Government agencies and ministries
  • Government and the Diet
  • Extra-government organizations
  • Prefectures and nuclear utilities
  • Public and non-governmental organizations

Japan’s system failure needs a Japanese solution, not a US or EU solution

…and the cleanup of the Fukushima disaster zone is absolutely essential for a restart of nuclear power in Japan.

  • Nuclear crisis: the Fukushima disaster area must be restored for new land use, to prove that future accidents will be cleaned up, and to give hope to residents
  • Social crisis: public health communication is necessary
  • Policy crisis: Japan’s Diet (Parliament) needs to hold a national dialogue on nuclear power and risk, who should have the power, who should have the responsibility and what level risk is acceptable

Balanced regulatory oversight needs to be established, and the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) needs proper oversight.

Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan
Chuck Casto: Balance of Nuclear Power Policy in Post-Fukushima Japan

Copyright (c) 2017 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved

(c)2009-2017 Eurotechnology Japan KK All Rights Reserved.